Category Archives: International Military Student Office

USASMA recognizes international students, inducts two into Hall of Fame

Warrant Officer Class One Don Spinks (l), Sergeant Major of the Australian Army and a graduate of Class 51, is assisted by Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, in unveiling his International Military Student Hall of Fame induction plaque. Spinks, along with fellow inductee, Sergeant Major of the Montenegro Army, Sergeant Major of the Armed Forces Vladin Kojic, were honored during ceremonies June 16 in the Academy’s Cooper Lecture Center.
Warrant Officer Class One Don Spinks (l), Sergeant Major of the Australian Army and a graduate of Class 51, is assisted by Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, in unveiling his International Military Student Hall of Fame induction plaque. Spinks, along with fellow inductee, Sergeant Major of the Montenegro Army, Sergeant Major of the Armed Forces Vladin Kojic, were honored during ceremonies June 16 in the Academy’s Cooper Lecture Center.

The United States Army Sergeants Major Academy ceremoniously recognized the academic accomplishments of the 45 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 66 June 16, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. The Academy also inducted two former international military students into the International Military Student Hall of Fame.

Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant, thanked everyone for attending the ceremony and honoring the international students.

“This morning we are going to one, recognize two outstanding leaders from their countries. Two we are recognizing our Class 66 international students who have spent the last 12 months here alongside their U.S. counterparts,” he said. “Our international program has a lot of importance to us for a few reasons – it helps us form partnerships with countries from all over the world and it helps broaden our sergeants majors and our officers; it is as much for us as it is for the international students. We get as much as we give.”

The U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy recognized the academic accomplishments of the 45 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 66 June 16, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. The Academy also inducted two former international military students into the International Military Student Hall of Fame. Above, Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of USASMA, addresses the audience.
The U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy recognized the academic accomplishments of the 45 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 66 June 16, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. The Academy also inducted two former international military students into the International Military Student Hall of Fame. Above, Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of USASMA, addresses the audience.

Defreese said that the international military badging and hall of fame induction ceremony is one of his favorite events of the year as it is the academy’s way of recognizing our international partners.

Following Defreese’s remarks, the academy recognized the two inductees of the International Military Student Hall of Fame. Many of the international students who have attended the Sergeants Major Course have gone on to make significant contributions to the lineage of their own NCO corps and education systems, but only a few have assumed the position of their respective country’s or armed forces senior enlisted advisor, a position similar to that of the U.S. Army’s Sergeant Major of the Army. The Academy recognized three individuals who have done just that by inducting them into the International Military Student Hall of Fame. Malloy assisted each of the honorees to unveil their induction plaques.

The first honoree was Warrant Officer Class One Don Spinks, Sergeant Major of the Australian Army and a graduate of Class 51. After unveiling his Hall of Fame plaque with the assistance of Defreese, Spinks addressed the audience.

“It is an enormous honor for me to be here. For an international student to come and attend the academy it is an enormous privilege, one that is not lost on any of us that have walked that path,” he said. “There is hardly a day that not gone by where I haven’t used or drawn on the experience, the understanding, or the knowledge that I gained here at this academy. I hope that reflect (the same) for all of you here today. … The Academy set me up for success; it gave me the foundation that I needed to be successful.”

Sgt. Maj. Miodrag Jokanovic, a Class 66 international student from Montenegro, is assisted by Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, in unveiling Sergeant Major of the Montenegro Army, Sergeant Major of the Armed Forces Vladin Kojic’s International Military Student Hall of Fame induction plaque. Kojic, along with fellow inductee, Warrant Officer Class One Don Spinks, Sergeant Major of the Australian Army, were honored during ceremonies June 16 in the Academy’s Cooper Lecture Center.
Sgt. Maj. Miodrag Jokanovic, a Class 66 international student from Montenegro, is assisted by Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, in unveiling Sergeant Major of the Montenegro Army, Sergeant Major of the Armed Forces Vladin Kojic’s International Military Student Hall of Fame induction plaque. Kojic, along with fellow inductee, Warrant Officer Class One Don Spinks, Sergeant Major of the Australian Army, were honored during ceremonies June 16 in the Academy’s Cooper Lecture Center.

The next honoree was the Sergeant Major of the Montenegro Army, Sergeant Major of the Armed Forces Vladin Kojic a graduate of Class 65. Speaking on behalf of Kojic was Sgt. Maj. Miodrag Jokanovic, a Class 66 international student from Montenegro who read a letter from Kojic.

“It is a great honor for me to be a member of the International Student Hall of Fame for the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy. In my opinion this a reward for all noncommissioned officers of the Armed Forces of Montenegro,” Jokanovic read. “At this academy I got the opportunity to get a broader perspective and a better understanding of modern warfare. I also got a chance to become more familiar with cultural diversity and meet friends from different continents, various religion and nationalities. The unique knowledge and experience I gained from this academy made me the leader I wanted to be.”

Following Jokanovic’s remarks, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Huffman, the director of the International Military Student Office, joined Defreese on stage to present the Class 66 International students with the USASMA International Military Student Badge signifying their successful completion of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy Sergeants Major Course.

The U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy International Military Student Office recognized the achievements of the 45 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 66 June 16, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. Above, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Huffman (center) presents Sgt. Maj. Mohammad Ibrahim Ahmadzai his International Military Student Badge while Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of USASMA, looks on.
The U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy International Military Student Office recognized the achievements of the 45 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 66 June 16, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. Above, retired Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Huffman (center) presents Sgt. Maj. Mohammad Ibrahim Ahmadzai his International Military Student Badge while Command Sgt. Maj. Dennis Defreese, commandant of USASMA, looks on.

Since the creation of the Sergeants Major Academy in July 1972, the Academy has had a direct impact on the education of the Army’s entire Corps of Noncommissioned Officers through its stewardship of NCO Professional Development Courses. To date, the Academy has graduated 23,639 students from the Sergeants Major Course and currently reaches more than 190,000 enlisted Soldiers annually through any one of its diverse academic products. The Academy gained international attention early on in its history and hosted its first international student in Sergeants Major Course Class 6 in 1975. Since then, it has graduated 821 international students from the Sergeants Major Course and dozens more from its other professional military education and functional courses. Our international partners proudly wear the Sergeants Major Academy International Military Student Badge and return to their homelands to expertly lead and train their Soldiers. Because of their experience at the Sergeants Major Academy, these great leaders maintain and strengthen productive relationships with the United States and their enlisted counterparts throughout the department of defense.

For more photos of the ceremony visit our Flickr site at https://www.flickr.com/photos/133821783@N02/albums.

International students get schooled on Congress

The international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, when Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, came to meet with them in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke made special note of the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans’ issues.
The international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, when Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, came to meet with them in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke made special note of the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans’ issues.

The international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, when Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, came to meet with them in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Michael Huffman, director of the International Military Student Office for the Academy introduced the congressman to the students.

“Usually every year on our field studies program we get the unique opportunity to speak with our congressional representative from El Paso while visiting Washington, D.C. Since congress is not in session during our trip this year, Congressman Beto O’Rourke has come to the Academy to brief you on his duties and responsibilities,” Huffman said. “You have already visited the city government; you visited the state government in Austin; so this is your last opportunity [to get an understanding of our form of government].”

Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, spent some time April 17 addressing the international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke talked about the political issues and climate in Washington as well as the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans’ issues.
Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, spent some time April 17 addressing the international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke talked about the political issues and climate in Washington as well as the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans’ issues.

With introductions over O’Rourke gave the students a brief overview of his duties as a first-term congressman, how he managed his campaign to win the congressional seat, his priorities in serving the constituents of the 16th District, and some of the things he has learned since becoming a congressman.

“When people ask me what has been surprising or interesting, something you didn’t know before you got here, that has been the real eye opener, the real shocking thing about our system of government in the U.S. and specifically the Congress, is how dominated it is by the desire to get re-elected and how critical money is in being able to be re-elected,” O’Rourke said. He added that he is for term limits and transparency in campaign finance and that his office has sponsored a bill that would bring transparency to campaign fundraising and would tie donor to candidates who make donations of $1,000 or more to any campaign.

O’Rourke said his two most important issues he focuses on are the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border and his work on the Veterans Affairs Committee and on veterans’ issues in El Paso.

“We spend a significant amount of our time on improving the prospects and perspective on the U.S./Mexico border in Congress. You all have the great fortune of spending a year here and you realize how wonderful El Paso is, the great weather, the wonderful people, the excellent Mexican food, and what you also realize is that we are the safest city in America today,” he said. “I like to tell people that we are the safest city because we have Fort Bliss, excellent law enforcement, wonderful people working the border patrol, but perhaps more importantly than all those other things is that we are the safest city in America not in spite of, but because of a wonderful and proud tradition of immigration into this community.”

O’Rourke noted however that many in Congress look at the border as a threat for illegal drug importation, human trafficking, weapons and terrorists, everything he said only goes to fuel the insecurities if the uninformed. In contrast, he pointed to the fact that about $90 billion in US/Mexico trade crosses through the ports of entry between El Paso and Mexico; 22 million legitimate legal crossing every year, those crossers spend about $1.5 billion in the local economy.

“So we have far more to gain by broadening and deepening our relationship with Mexico, focusing on positive, capitalizing on the opportunities, then we do to shut down the border,” he said. “So a lot of our efforts in congress [is] educating my colleagues about the positive dynamics of the border and introducing legislation to improve how we treat the border and maybe shift away from a law enforcement dominated perspective.”

Turning to veterans issues, O’Rourke said El Paso and the surrounding area is home to about 100,000 veterans who are served out of the Veterans Affairs Clinic located on the grounds of the William Beaumont Army Medical.

The international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, when Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, came to meet with them in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke made special not of the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans issues.
The international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, when Congressman Beto O’Rourke, 16th District, El Paso, came to meet with them in the west auditorium of the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas. O’Rourke made special not of the dynamics of the U.S./Mexico border relations and veterans issues.

“It is a system that in many cases unfortunately has failed our veterans – very hard to get a medical appointment, very hard to see a mental health specialist and those who were injured in service to their country, sometimes, far too often; it is very hard to get an answer back when they file a service-connected disability claim,” he said.

O’Rourke ended his comments thanking the students for allow him to address them and opened the floor up to questions which ranged from how does getting re-elected fit into the daily business of being a congressman to party discipline in voting on issues .

“Their questions were great and they were very basic questions that I would be asked by a constituent in El Paso – ‘What are you doing for your district, what are your goals, what have you attempted that you have been unable to accomplish.’  It really shows you that representation and the political process transcends countries,” O’Rourke said. “People are interested in the same things no matter where they are from. I was grateful that I was not asked any difficult geopolitical questions and could focus on those things that we really know best, the border.”

The Field Studies Program objective is to ensure that the students return to their homeland with an understanding of the responsibilities of governments, militaries, and citizens to protect, preserve, and respect the rights of every individual. Areas of focus are human rights, diversity and American life, U.S. government institutions , political processes, the judicial system, the free market system, education health and human services, media, international peace and security and the law of war.

The international students will visit Washington, D.C., next week to learn more about our federal government, our history and nation.

Command Sgt. Maj. Mopati Pusoile of Botswana presents Congressman Beto O’Rourke a Class 64 Cookbook as a token of thanks for the congressman taking time to speck to the class. The students got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, as part of the Field Studies Program. The students will visit Washington, D.C., next week to further their education on our government and our history.
Command Sgt. Maj. Mopati Pusoile of Botswana presents Congressman Beto O’Rourke a Class 64 Cookbook as a token of thanks for the congressman taking time to speck to the class. The students got a first-hand accounting of the happenings in the U.S. Congress April 17, as part of the Field Studies Program. The students will visit Washington, D.C., next week to further their education on our government and our history.

USASMA’s international students help local college celebrate diversity

Photo by David Crozier, USASMA Master Sgt. Kippei Shiba of Japan talks to one of many visitors to the EPCC Administrative Services Center Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.
Photo by David Crozier, USASMA
Master Sgt. Kippei Shiba of Japan talks to one of many visitors to the EPCC Administrative Services Center Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.

The El Paso Community College Administrative Services Center took on the identity of a mini United Nations March 1, as the college’s Diversity Program put on its inaugural International Festival and Cultural Bowl thanks to the help of five local cultural groups and several international students from the International Military Student program at the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, Fort Bliss, Texas.

The first-ever event, hosted by the EPCC, combined a two hour academic challenge event with an international fair in hopes of promoting a broader cultural awareness among El Pasoans and the surrounding area.

“We are here celebrating diversity,” said Olga Chavez, director of Diversity Programs for EPCC. “We have two tremendous events going on – One we have the academic side with the culture bowl in which high school students come together in teams and answer questions on different cultures, and we are doing our international festival in which the Sergeants Major Academy and five other organizations from other cultures have come together to show off their country. We hope to let people know what different cultures are, because many of us in El Paso never get out of the district or out of our own cultures. So we want them to explore and learn more about each other [through this event].”

Photo by David Crozier, USASMA Sgt. Maj. Amran Mohammed of Malaysia talks to one of many visitors to the EPCC Administrative Services Center Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.
Photo by David Crozier, USASMA
Sgt. Maj. Amran Mohammed of Malaysia talks to one of many visitors to the EPCC Administrative Services Center Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.

Chavez said the Academy’s involvement in the event was important for many reasons, but mainly because of the fact that there are so many different countries represented through the Sergeants Major Course.

Doropeo Franco, assistant director of Diversity Programs for EPCC, lauded the Academy for being able to provide representatives for 28 of the 33 counties that participated in the inaugural event.

“This festival would not be possible without the support of the Sergeants Major Academy,” he said. “They have been so good to bring the students and the families and their flags. It is just a tremendous thing that they are doing for us. “

Joyce Stophel, the Field Studies Program Manager for the International Military Student Office at the Academy, said the students volunteered to take part in the event and were happy to help EPCC kick off their inaugural event.

“[EPCC] knew about the Sergeants Major Academy having the international program and asked if we would join in with them to expose the high school students to more of the different cultures in El Paso. They wanted to give them the experience to meet each of the countries and their representatives, a sergeant major, and to learn a little bit about their countries [face-to-face] rather than sitting in a classroom textbook-wise,” she said. “This also falls under the field studies program by helping us to get our students out and meet with the local schools. We also get to promote our host family sponsorship program as a way of meeting people throughout the community that might be interested in sponsoring some of our internationals for the next class.”

Photo by David Crozier, USASMA The El Paso Folk Dance team Karadeniz performs a traditional Turkish folk dance during the El Paso Community College inaugural International Festival and Cultural Bowl, held Saturday at the EPCC Administrative Services Center. The dance troupe were one of several who helped EPCC show the Spirit of Diversity of El Paso and included international students  and their families from the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy who represented 28 of the 33 countries participating in the event.
Photo by David Crozier, USASMA
The El Paso Folk Dance team Karadeniz performs a traditional Turkish folk dance during the El Paso Community College inaugural International Festival and Cultural Bowl, held Saturday at the EPCC Administrative Services Center. The dance troupe were one of several who helped EPCC show the Spirit of Diversity of El Paso and included international students and their families from the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy who represented 28 of the 33 countries participating in the event.

With table arrangements and audio/visual equipment provided by EPCC, the Sergeants Major Course Class 64 international students brought in their laptops, brochures, artifacts and country flags prepared to talk about their country to any and all who would listen.

“The first thing I try to explain about is which place is best to visit in my country,” said Sgt. Maj. Amran Mohammed of Malaysia. “Then I try to explain to them about my flag, my language, my customs, traditions, everything. So far I really, really enjoy it.”

Master Sgt. Kippei Shiba of Japan had a similar experience.

“Today I talk about my culture and give demonstration of our traditions to everyone,” he said. “They are very interested about the Samurai Sword and Japanese calligraphy, and my son; he is wearing his karate suit so we are talking about that also. This is very awesome, I really enjoy this.”

To encourage visits to all of the international displays and participants, USASMA made up a passport book which students and visitors could take

Photo by David Crozier, USASMA Master Sgt. Siim Vark of Estonia talks to a group of Junior Reserve Officer Training Cadets from Irving High School Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.
Photo by David Crozier, USASMA
Master Sgt. Siim Vark of Estonia talks to a group of Junior Reserve Officer Training Cadets from Irving High School Saturday, about his country’s customs, traditions and history during the inaugural EPCC International Festival and Cultural Bowl. Members of Sergeants Major Course Class 64 International students along with representatives from the Academy’s International Military Student Office spent the day helping EPCC celebrate diversity by providing 28 of the 33 countries represented at their inaugural event.

to each station to have it stamped and to meet with the different cultures. As attendees made their way through the numerous information booths to get their passport stamped they were entertained by various dance and musical groups who performed on the main stage and further cemented the theme of the Spirit of Diversity.The event expected to attract more than 400 people throughout the day.

USASMA Recognizes International Students, Inducts Three Into Hall of Fame

This year's inductees into the International Military Student Hall of Fame are Force Sergeant Major of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force, Chief Warrant Officer Raphael Oa; Sergeant Major of the Swiss Army Pius Mueller; and Sergeant Major of the Taiwan Army Chi-Jui Chuang.
This year’s inductees into the International Military Student Hall of Fame are Force Sergeant Major of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force, Chief Warrant Officer Raphael Oa; Sergeant Major of the Swiss Army Pius Mueller; and Sergeant Major of the Taiwan Army Chi-Jui Chuang.

By: David Crozier Command Communications

The United States Army Sergeants Major Academy ceremoniously recognized the academic accomplishments of the 41 international students of Sergeants Major Course Class 63 June 20, by awarding them the International Military Student Badge. The Academy also recognized the service of four of its Military Professional Exchange Program instructors and inducted three former international military students into the International Military Student Hall of Fame.

Command Sgt. Maj. Rory L. Malloy, commandant, thanked everyone for attending the ceremony and honoring the international students.

“What a great day in our academy history as we formally recognize the academic achievements and the leadership of our international students upon the occasion of their graduation from Class 63,” he said. “Since 18 August 1975, when the first international student attended the academy we have graduated 698 international partners from 72 countries and class 63 has added 41 distinguished graduates to that roll. Class 63 international students have represented their country as a military very well.”

Malloy said every year there are a couple of students who stand out among their peers and this class of international students was no different. Most of the recognition is through academic achievement, he added, such as the student from Switzerland, Senior Warrant Officer Olivier Ditzler, who had the highest GPA of the international students and which also beat out many of the U.S. Army students; or the two students who for the first time in academy history were graduating with a collegiate degree – Sgt. Maj. Genc Metaj from Kosovo and Sgt. Maj. Yi-Jyun Chen of Taiwan – both of whom earned a Masters Degree in Leadership from the University of Texas at El Paso.

“However, I believe the class and international partners would agree the one who leaves the most lasting impact, not only for his academic achievements which were displayed during his attendance at the academy,” Malloy said, “But during the last couple of weeks of the course, in probably the most challenging department, he went down to San Antonio and underwent brain surgery for cancer, came back and completed all academic requirements and will graduate here this morning –Master Sgt. Baysgalan Olonbayar from Mongolia.”

Following Malloy’s remarks, the academy awarded the international students their student badges and certificates and then turned their attention to the Military Professional Exchange Program Instructors by awarding them the Meritorious Service Medal for their work and contributions at the Academy. Recognized were: Warrant Officer One John Kirkham of the Australian Army, Sergeant major Joao Marcelo Mota of the Brazilian Army, Adjutant Johannes Haans of the Royal Netherlands Army, and Senior Warrant Officer Mok Chia Kee of the Singapore Army.

Many of the international students who have attended the Sergeants Major Course have gone on to make significant contributions to the lineage of their own NCO corps and education systems, but only a few have assumed the position of their respective country’s or armed forces senior enlisted advisor, a position similar to that of the U.S. Army’s Sergeant Major of the Army. The Academy recognized three individuals who have done just that by inducting them into the International Military Student Hall of Fame. Malloy assisted each of the honorees to unveil their induction plaques.

The first honoree was Force Sergeant Major of the Papua New Guinea Defence Force, Chief Warrant Officer Raphael Oa, a graduate of Sergeants Major Course Class 61. Oa thanked the Academy for honoring him and then praised the work of the cadre for their efforts.

“The Sergeants Major Academy is a great opportunity for military education, personnel development, understanding of all aspects of army operations, including full-spectrum operations and irregular warfare,” Oa said. “The curriculum of USASMA is a great exposure to not only US army operations but also of several foreign countries. My advice to all international students is, you get out of it what you put into it.”

The next honoree was the Sergeant Major of the Swiss Army Pius Mueller a graduate of Class 47.

“It is a great honor and a pleasure to be here,” he said. “Nineteen ninety seven was the last time I was here as student. So you see we always come back to our roots.”

Mueller gave a quick break down of his country’s military and then encouraged the international students to understand one another’s military, accomplishments and what they bring to the table.

“We need a common language and a common understanding and this [Sergeants Major] course is a fine example of this process, especially together with all of the international students,” Mueller said. “I am convinced that due to this training you will be better NCOs indeed. It is certainly a benefit for all of our nations.”

The final inductee was the Sergeant Major of the Taiwan Army Chi-Jui Chuang who is a graduate of Class 54. Chuang immediately turned his attention to the international students who were graduating by addressing the things they learned while attending the academy.

“I want you to know, the knowledge that you get and the friends that you have formed here; the partnership will endure. What is more, the leadership skills you have acquired here will help you, your commander develop the NCO of tomorrow,” he said. “Without the dedication and selfless service of the [faculty] and leadership of USASMA we could not make this happen. It is indeed an honor to be recognized and inducted into your hall of fame and most prestigious NCO academy in the world.”

Following the ceremony the inductees were taken to the International Military Student Hall of Fame area to be shown where their plaques would be put on display among the other honorees of years past. For more photos of the ceremony and Hall of Fame Induction visit USASMA Photo Archive.