Welcome to The NCO Leadership Center of Excellence

  • NCOL CoE provides Professional Military Education that develops enlisted leaders to meet the challenges of an increasingly complex world.

Since 1972 the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, has developed, integrated, and delivered education and training readiness for the Army graduating hundreds of thousands of Soldiers from various Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development System courses. To meet the needs of NCO 2025 and beyond, a need arose to reorganize the USASMA mission. On June 22, 2018, The NCO Leadership Center of Excellence was established to meet that mission allowing the USASMA to focus on its original mission, that of a special preparation source for the Army’s NCO elite. The Center is headed by a three-star level nominative command sergeant major and is supported by a world-class staff and academic faculty.

Our mission is to provide professional military education that develops enlisted into fit, disciplined, well-educated professionals capable of meeting  the challenges of an increasingly complex world..

ATTENTION!! The Basic Leader Course – Redesigned – goes FOC on Feb 1 and the Distributed Leader Course I will launch Feb 1. Check out the Fact Sheets below.

BLC Fact Sheet with FAQs

DLC Fact Sheet with FAQs

NCOL CoE calls for Hall of Honor Nominations

 

 

 

 

 

The NCO Leadership Center of Excellence (NCOL COE) will conduct its annual Hall of Honor Induction Ceremony in June 2019. The Hall of Honor was established in May 2006, with the purpose of providing a highly visible and prestigious means of recognizing individuals who meritoriously contributed either directly to the NCOL COE/USASMA or to the Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development System (NCOPDS), formerly known as the Noncommissioned Officer Education System (NCOES).   Inductees must have served meritoriously in a position of significant responsibility and provided service distinguished by meritorious achievement and significant improvements or enhancements to existing programs or procedures.

Should you or your principal know of someone you feel deserves such recognition, by all means we request you submit a nomination. Nomination criteria and submission processing guidance are attached. Any questions concerning the information contained in this correspondence may be directed to the NCO Leadership Center of Excellence, ATTN: Director, Human Resources, COM: 915-744-8816 (DSN: 621), or email to Christynne.m.leon-gorcyca.civ@mail.mil.

Nomination documents can be found on the Hall of Honor page.

 

Bradford inducted into Hall of Honor

Photo by Spc. James Seals
On 14 December the NCOL CoE inducted Ms. Betty Bradford into its Hall of Honor for her 33 years of tireless service to the betterment of NCO Professional Development as the first Registrar of the institution. Above, Assisted by Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy Sellers, commandant of the NCOL CoE, Ms. Bradford unveils her Hall of Honor plaque that will hang among her fellow honorees on the walls of the Cooper Lecture Center.

By David Crozier, Command Communications

The NCO Leadership Center of Excellence recognized Ms. Betty Bradford, NCOL CoE Registrar December 14, for her contributions to the education, training and lineage of the Noncommissioned Officer Corps and NCO Education System by inducting her into The NCOL CoE Hall of Honor. Charles Guyette, Assistant Dean, U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy, hosted the event along with Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy J. Sellers, commandant of the Center of Excellence.

“Today I have the honor of introducing the newest inductee into the United States Army Sergeants Major Academy and Noncommissioned Officer Leadership Center of Excellence Hall of Honor,” Guyette said. “We are the proponent for NCO History, so I am going to tie a little bit of history into my remarks.”

Guyette gave a brief history of Army education and training beginning with Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, the author of the Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States (The Blue Book) in 1778, to the establishment of the 2nd Constabulary Brigade’s NCO school in Munich Germany in 1947 and later the Seventh Army Noncommissioned Officers Academy, to ultimately the creation of the Sergeants Major Academy in 1972. . … Read More

 

Leadership Panel Discusses NCO Roles and Responsibilities

The NCO Leadership Center of Excellence held a leadership panel for the students of Sergeants Major Course Class 69 who were in the professional studies portion of the course. The panel consisted of Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy Sellers, commandant, NCO Leadership Center of Excellence; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Henry, deputy commandant, NCOL CoE; Command Sgt. Maj. Brian Barker, 5th Armored Brigade, First Army West; and Sgt. Maj. LaDerek Green, a facilitator in the Department of Command Leadership and was facilitated by Command Sgt. Maj. (ret) Dave Stewart, from the Department of Force Management.
Story and Photos by David Crozier, Command Communications

The students of Sergeants Major Course Class 69, who are in the Department of Professional Studies, were treated to a panel discussion November 6, on NCO Roles and Responsibilities. Command Sgt. Maj. (ret) Dave Stewart, from the Department of Force Management, facilitated the event. Panel members included Command Sgt. Maj. Jimmy Sellers, commandant, NCO Leadership Center of Excellence; Command Sgt. Maj. Michael Henry, deputy commandant, NCOL CoE; Command Sgt. Maj. Brian Barker, 5th Armored Brigade, First Army West; and Sgt. Maj. LaDerek Green, a facilitator in the Department of Command Leadership.
The session began with the showing of the video, “CSM/SGM Roles and Responsibilities – Leader Core Competencies” which intertwined the NCO Creed and the LCCs – Program Management, Operations, Readiness, Leadership, Communication, and Training Management – creating a correlation to NCO roles and responsibilities.
“That is probably not the first time you have seen that video or had a discussion on the NCO Creed,” Stewart said. “But what is an NCO?”
The question received several different answers ranging from mentor to standard bearer and Stewart agreed with them all saying there were similarities in everything they said, but there were some differences as well, and asked, “Why the difference?”
“We always refer back to the NCO Creed to determine what we should be doing in any given situation,” he said. “But when the LCCs were first brought out by the NCOL CoE it (helped us) define and codify those roles and responsibilities so we can have a shared understanding of what an NCO is.”
Stewart added the LCCs are not going to tell you to get up every morning at 5:00 a.m. and do certain things; they were derived to give NCOs their left and right limits.
“Good NCOs fill in the voids that a unit has, but by defining the leader core competencies what we are able to do is give you a minimum (level) of the things that you should have your hands in.” Read More

What Is NCOL CoE For?

To Develop, Integrate and Deliver Education and Training Readiness.

What Do We Do?

We provide professional military education that develops enlisted leaders into fit, disciplined, well-educated professionals capable of meeting  the challenges of an increasingly complex world.

 

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